Jennifer Lester ’06, business manager for the family tree-care company, works evenings so she can care for Eddie during the day.

Jennifer Lester ’06, business manager for the family tree-care company, works evenings so she can care for Eddie during the day.

I never wanted or planned to work after having a baby. But my husband and I own a small business, and I ended up working part time just under two months after my son was born, out of necessity. The good news? I work from home. The bad news? I work from home. That meant I was “able” to be with my son while I was working, but it also made me feel incredibly distracted. No one was getting my best, and that took a toll—on my work, on my marriage, on myself. It was a very frustrating and defeating time.

It took a good six months to gain some balance. The best thing I did was to switch to a more advisory role. I could work in the evenings, and it didn’t matter what kind of noise my baby was making since I no longer had to be on the phone. The other change was to get a babysitter a few times during the week. I now have strategic, focused hours to get my work done.

Motherhood is hard and messy and full of sacrifices. I have learned to just accept this season of life and make the time that I have with my son count.

—Jennifer Lester ’06, one child, 16 months

Carve Out Time for Fun

For mothers who work until 6 p.m., it can be very challenging getting dinner on the table, doing homework and getting the kids to bed, but it can help to carve out 15 or 20 minutes of that time to just be silly and have fun.”

—Noelle Bell Perese ’05

 

SAQ, Winter 2015–16